5 little things you can practise daily to improve your english exam results!

5 little things you can practice daily to improve your english exam results!

Every student wants to know the formula for exam success. I know I did.

When I was 15, I would look at those perched proudly at the top of the class and always wonder – how it is that they always did so well?

The whole thing was just so elusive to me! Was it luck? Did they have to study for 6 hours every night to prepare for exams? Were they just born smart? I didn’t have a tutor to ask and my parents weren’t really involved in my studies. I wish I had known the answer back then!

It’s simpler than you think. The answer is consistency. The fact is, to do well in anything at all, particularly exams, consistency is the main ingredient. A surgeon will have to consistently work on their technique for years and years. Professional athletes train every day. Every single day.

So consistently do…what exactly? I am here to tell you the 5 little things you can practise every day that will improve your English exam scores.

1. Read books (30 mins) This can be fiction (let’s face it, so much more interesting), or read your textbook again. I am amazed by how often I’ll walk into my first lesson with a new student and learn that they’re unfamiliar with their books. Read, guys! Even if it’s just for 30 minutes – about the same length as an Aussie soap. Easy!

2. Read articles about your subject (30 mins) Once you are familiar with the work in your texts, read articles. Reading articles, journals and essays are so important because they broaden your knowledge in preparation for your exams.

Say you’re studying Macbeth. It’s useful to read other people’s essays and journals because it enables you to access a range of interesting new perspectives and arguments. Perspectives that you can learn from and perhaps adopt. For example, a reading on “Gender: Masculine and Feminine ideals in Macbeth,” will teach you about one way the text has been received and consequently, the social progression it achieves. So, get on Google and research. Pick one article today and just read it. It will only take you 15-30 minutes.

3. Write (20 mins) Writing every single day is very important. Why? It’s constant practise, and if you practise you’ll inevitably see results as everything becomes second nature – almost like a reflex. You’re going to do a lot of writing in your exams and in your classes, so best to embrace it!

It doesn’t matter what it sounds like or how it comes out. Forget your negative thoughts about what you wrote. All of that is irrelevant, so in the words of an old teacher of mine, “Don’t get it right. Get it written”. For example, write an introduction to a possible exam essay question, or write a summary about the subject you’re studying. It doesn’t need to be perfect. That comes over time.

4. Watch videos – I’m serious! (15 mins) The internet can be a horrible distraction, but it can also be an absolute gold mine for students gearing up for exams (you just need to steer clear of all the cat videos).

Get on YouTube and watch videos about your topic. The internet is flooded with information on just about everything! Studying Frost? Get online and watch other people’s analysis on the text – trust me, your mind will be blown. It’s an easy short cut to getting answers and just clarifying all the things you were unsure about. In fact, check out the link below. This is an example of the amazing source of information that is YouTube! It is so specific too, aimed at HSC students!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTuqSZOx0AU&t=628s

A word of warning – some information won’t be great, (just like in books and online articles) so you may have to do some filtering. But trust your judgment. When videos prove to be no good, move on and find links that will benefit you!

5. Rest (10 mins every hour) This means different things for different people. It can take the form of naps, reading novels, exercising, watching TV etc. Whatever you need to do to recharge, do it. I recommend a break every 1 hour. That might mean working for 50 mins followed by a 10 min break. During your break try to tune out and clear your mind of anything work or exam related. A mental break is extremely important, because it will enable your return to your studies fresh.

So that’s the formula. Or my formula, at least. If you follow these tips, your exam results will improve because your understanding of the subject will be expanded. Can you believe this is only about an hour and a half a night?

I’d like to do something a little bit different with this blog and end on some quotes from some very successful people who all had one thing in common…can you guess what it is?

“It’s not what we do once in a while that shapes our lives. It’s what we do consistently” – Anthony Robbins

“Long term consistency trumps short term intensity” – Bruce Lee

“Consistent action creates consistent results” – Christine Kane
Every student wants to know the formula for exam success. I know I did.

When I was 15, I would look at those perched proudly at the top of the class and always wonder – how it is that they always did so well?

The whole thing was just so elusive to me! Was it luck? Did they have to study for 6 hours every night to prepare for exams? Were they just born smart? I didn’t have a tutor to ask and my parents weren’t really involved in my studies. I wish I had known the answer back then!

It’s simpler than you think. The answer is consistency. The fact is, to do well in anything at all, particularly exams, consistency is the main ingredient. A surgeon will have to consistently work on their technique for years and years. Professional athletes train every day. Every single day.

So consistently do…what exactly? I am here to tell you the 5 little things you can practise every day that will improve your English exam scores.

1. Read books (30 mins)
This can be fiction (let’s face it, so much more interesting), or read your textbook again. I am amazed by how often I’ll walk into my first lesson with a new student and learn that they’re unfamiliar with their books. Read, guys! Even if it’s just for 30 minutes – about the same length as an Aussie soap. Easy!

2. Read articles about your subject (30 mins)
Once you are familiar with the work in your texts, read articles. Reading articles, journals and essays are so important because they broaden your knowledge in preparation for your exams.

Say you’re studying Macbeth. It’s useful to read other people’s essays and journals because it enables you to access a range of interesting new perspectives and arguments. Perspectives that you can learn from and perhaps adopt. For example, a reading on “Gender: Masculine and Feminine ideals in Macbeth,” will teach you about one way the text has been received and consequently, the social progression it achieves. So, get on Google and research. Pick one article today and just read it. It will only take you 15-30 minutes.

3. Write (20 mins)
Writing every single day is very important. Why? It’s constant practise, and if you practise you’ll inevitably see results as everything becomes second nature – almost like a reflex. You’re going to do a lot of writing in your exams and in your classes, so best to embrace it!

It doesn’t matter what it sounds like or how it comes out. Forget your negative thoughts about what you wrote. All of that is irrelevant, so in the words of an old teacher of mine, “Don’t get it right. Get it written”. For example, write an introduction to a possible exam essay question, or write a summary about the subject you’re studying. It doesn’t need to be perfect. That comes over time.

4. Watch videos – I’m serious! (15 mins)
The internet can be a horrible distraction, but it can also be an absolute gold mine for students gearing up for exams (you just need to steer clear of all the cat videos).

Get on YouTube and watch videos about your topic. The internet is flooded with information on just about everything! Studying Frost? Get online and watch other people’s analysis on the text – trust me, your mind will be blown. It’s an easy short cut to getting answers and just clarifying all the things you were unsure about. In fact, check out the link below. This is an example of the amazing source of information that is YouTube! It is so specific too, aimed at HSC students!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTuqSZOx0AU&t=628s

A word of warning – some information won’t be great, (just like in books and online articles) so you may have to do some filtering. But trust your judgment. When videos prove to be no good, move on and find links that will benefit you!

5. Rest (10 mins every hour)
This means different things for different people. It can take the form of naps, reading novels, exercising, watching TV etc. Whatever you need to do to recharge, do it. I recommend a break every 1 hour. That might mean working for 50 mins followed by a 10 min break. During your break try to tune out and clear your mind of anything work or exam related. A mental break is extremely important, because it will enable your return to your studies fresh.

So that’s the formula. Or my formula, at least. If you follow these tips, your exam results will improve because your understanding of the subject will be expanded. Can you believe this is only about an hour and a half a night?

I’d like to do something a little bit different with this blog and end on some quotes from some very successful people who all had one thing in common…can you guess what it is?

“It’s not what we do once in a while that shapes our lives. It’s what we do consistently” – Anthony Robbins

“Long term consistency trumps short term intensity” – Bruce Lee

“Consistent action creates consistent results” – Christine Kane