5 things you can do at home to improve your handwriting skills

5 things you can do at home to improve your handwriting skills

Everyone knows we’re in the generation of screens.

Back in the day, my fluoro pentel pen was my bestie and writing with it really was the best! Now it’s tablets, over-sized iPhones, and laptops that kids are fascinated by.

Throughout my entire primary and high school education I never even owned a laptop. I rarely typed on any screen. In fact, any class where they stuck you in front of a computer was novel and exciting. I had to learn how to type as a teen – and boy was I slow.

Students today certainly don’t have any problems typing, but where does this leave their handwriting skills?

The sad truth is that laptops have become a crutch. I’ve often found students to be perfectly happy making notes on their portable device of choice, but they never get a pen out during the lesson.

While the technological revolution continues (with no sign of slowing), it’s important to remember that many of the exams students sit are still on good old-fashioned paper. Touch typing won’t do you any good when you need to write out an essay in 40 minutes. Plus, a sheet of paper isn’t going to auto-correct your spelling.

The presence of laptops will only increase in schools. So be it. I’m all for it. But they’ll never make basic handwriting skills irrelevant. It’s important for students to keep improving the style, speed, and accuracy of their writing.

With that in mind, here are some of my tips for students to help them improve their handwriting skills:

      1. Ensure that phones are put away, and not touched during homework time. Have them charging in another room if need be.

      2. When reading, you should write down new words that you don’t know the meaning of and learn them – create a book full of vocabulary lists that are specific to each topic. I did this myself in high school, and my teachers always complimented me on my diction.

      3. Have hand written notes for each topic you study. Use the exercise book you use for school; that way you can access any information learned whilst in class.

      4. Edit your handwritten work after every draft. This means once you are finished writing, go over your work and proof read it – you will be surprised by all the little mistakes you will find!

      5. Write out your essays. Then you can transfer it to the laptop if you must. This gets you used to getting the spelling right without the help of any software. When it comes to written exams, this will also help you to figure out whether an essay is the right length for the time you’ll be allocated.

Everyone knows we’re in the generation of screens.

Back in the day, my fluoro pentel pen was my bestie and writing with it really was the best! Now it’s tablets, over-sized iPhones, and laptops that kids are fascinated by.

Throughout my entire primary and high school education I never even owned a laptop. I rarely typed on any screen. In fact, any class where they stuck you in front of a computer was novel and exciting. I had to learn how to type as a teen – and boy was I slow.

Students today certainly don’t have any problems typing, but where does this leave their handwriting skills?

The sad truth is that laptops have become a crutch. I’ve often found students to be perfectly happy making notes on their portable device of choice, but they never get a pen out during the lesson.

While the technological revolution continues (with no sign of slowing), it’s important to remember that many of the exams students sit are still on good old-fashioned paper. Touch typing won’t do you any good when you need to write out an essay in 40 minutes. Plus, a sheet of paper isn’t going to auto-correct your spelling.

The presence of laptops will only increase in schools. So be it. I’m all for it. But they’ll never make basic handwriting skills irrelevant. It’s important for students to keep improving the style, speed, and accuracy of their writing.

With that in mind, here are some of my tips for students to help them improve their handwriting skills:

      1. Ensure that phones are put away, and not touched during homework time. Have them charging in another room if need be.

      2. When reading, you should write down new words that you don’t know the meaning of and learn them – create a book full of vocabulary lists that are specific to each topic. I did this myself in high school, and my teachers always complimented me on my diction.

      3. Have hand written notes for each topic you study. Use the exercise book you use for school; that way you can access any information learned whilst in class.

      4. Edit your handwritten work after every draft. This means once you are finished writing, go over your work and proof read it – you will be surprised by all the little mistakes you will find!

      5. Write out your essays. Then you can transfer it to the laptop if you must. This gets you used to getting the spelling right without the help of any software. When it comes to written exams, this will also help you to figure out whether an essay is the right length for the time you’ll be allocated.